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CPC Multiple Choice (RH & PT) Sample Assessment Material

DavidSummers
DavidSu ...
Posts: 32

All,

As you may be aware, there are sample assessment materials for both the RH and PT Multiple Choice on the OCR website (in the Assessment Materials tab on both the RH and PT pages). This includes a 60 question sample MC and Mark Scheme.

This is shortly being updated as some of the questions are now out of date. It will be replaced by a current 30 question sample paper and associated mark scheme.

I will post on here again once the changes have been made.

Many thanks,

David Summers

Sector Manager, CPC. 

 

Replies

Mike Grant
Mike Grant
Posts: 142

All,

I have prepared the following for my students to read in conjunction with the 60 question P1 sample.  Feel free to use it if it is thought useful and I would be pleased to hear of any alterations or additions whch might improve it.

 

SAMPLE P1 PAPER DATED 2011 – Observations at 7th December 2016

 

Since being published, a number of changes and issues effect the questions posed. This document seeks to address these as an aid to students preparing to take the exam.

 

Q4. The question is outdated as lost property legislation unique to PSV operation has been revoked in England and Wales.

 

Q46. The term “local transport authority” misleads.  It was defined for England and Wales within the Local Transport Act 2008.  The fore-running O-Licence legislation (PPV Act 1981), current guidance notes and Notices & Proceedings all refer to the “local authority” as the objector.

 

Q54. This question is confused as the listed items are not all personal documents as asserted.

 

Q59. The question muddles Vitesse 100 and Tempo 100 requirements which are not the same.  Also modern vehicles do not generally need specific certification to Tempo 100 status to be able to run at 100 kmph in Germany.

 

DavidSummers
DavidSu ...
Posts: 32

Mike,

I just wanted to check that you are content with this proposal for the 60 question SAM and the supplementary 30 questions on the website?

thanks

David

Mike Grant
Mike Grant
Posts: 142
Quote:
Originally posted by DavidSummers, 15:31, 2nd December 2016

Mike,

I just wanted to check that you are content with this proposal for the 60 question SAM and the supplementary 30 questions on the website?

thanks

David

 

David,

I am pleased that the 60 question sample papers have been restored.

I have thought that it would be helpful if it was known which of the established example questions were outdated.  When I have a spare moment, I plan to compile and invite comment on a listing, at least for P1 questions where my knowledge is stronger, so that colleagues can inform students accordingly.

I thought there was ambiguity with some of the 30 passenger questions. 

I remain worried about the downturn in multiple choice exam performance and whether on-line candidates are at an advantage in getting feedback.  I would still like answers to the questions I pointed out to you.

I am more than disappointed that my earlier request for some statistical evidence regarding performance by syllabus topic in the September exam was acknowledged but then seemingly ignored. 

I would be interested to know where OCR currently stands on the “transparency” issues concerning the multiple choice papers.  It’s impossible to work to bring about improvements when so much is hidden away.

 

Darren Ieronimo
Darren ...
Posts: 35

David, that sounds like a good compromise to me. I always instruct my candidates that some questions on the 60 question sample exam may be out of date (Financial Standing, speed limits etc.) but even so this is a valuable resource to help them prepare for R1/P1 exams and can be a very useful 'yardstick'. This is the first opportunity for then]m to attempt a practice exam and gives them a feel for the real thing as far as content, timing, amount of calcualtion questions, layout as well as checking their knowledge. I use them as a hard copy mock exam and also send the candidates home with a copy to re-try after revision on weak areas.

No doubt the 30-question papers will be of added benefit, much better than them being a replacement for the 60 question sample papers.

 

Thanks Darren.

DavidSummers
DavidSu ...
Posts: 32

Hello all,

Firstly thanks for all the comments. Having now discussed this issue with colleagues in Assessment and elsewhere in the business, I now propose that OCR do the following:

We will put the old 60 question SAM back on to the website with a caveat that this practice test contains some questions which are out of date due to legislation changes. In light of this, OCR have produced a new sample of 30 questions in order to better support our customers. Due to customer requests, we have decided NOT to remove the original practice papers so that candidates can still see an example of a paper that contains all of the features of a question paper (including instructions on the front cover, the number of questions and levels of difficulty). As some questions in the original practice test may well no longer be valid, the new questions will sit alongside the practice test to give a better indication of questions that will cover current legislation. 

The new 30 question paper is a "sample of practice questions" and will be re-designed as such. It is a supporting document to the 60 question SAM.

thanks

David Summers

Sector Manager

Mike Grant
Mike Grant
Posts: 142

Nationwide,

I agree that the Guide gives an indication of the span of questions over the eight syllabus section headings but that's nowhere near as informative as the mark scheme which drills two levels lower and shows the topic reference for each question.

The new information is titled as a 1 hour "Practice Paper" - I can't see the point in practising something which doesn't portray the real thing - particularly as they could, and always previously have had, a sample of reality.

nationwide
nationwide
Posts: 10

Mike,

The Syllabus, Student and Tutor Guide gives candidates an accurate idea of the number of questions to be expected from each syllabus area, whereas, as I understood it, the sample assessment material was merely a number of typical questions and therefore, no more than could be produced by you or I as trainers.

I always point my students to that guide as an invaluable reference source for both how the multiple choice paper is made up and also for how to answer case study questions.

nationwide
nationwide
Posts: 10

Good afternoon Mike and Darren,

I think you are possibly being a little unfair to OCR with this line of discussion. I don't expect OCR to produce my training materials for me, surely it's our job to compile sets of typical questions for the multiple choice paper revision. That's what I do. Can we really expect them to do any more than give an indication of the types of question which might appear. I don't see the benefit of 60 questions, over and above  that of 30

 

Mike Grant
Mike Grant
Posts: 142
Quote:
Originally posted by nationwide, 16:17, 28th November 2016

Good afternoon Mike and Darren,

I think you are possibly being a little unfair to OCR with this line of discussion. I don't expect OCR to produce my training materials for me, surely it's our job to ...

Read more
Read less

Good afternoon Mike and Darren,

I think you are possibly being a little unfair to OCR with this line of discussion. I don't expect OCR to produce my training materials for me, surely it's our job to compile sets of typical questions for the multiple choice paper revision. That's what I do. Can we really expect them to do any more than give an indication of the types of question which might appear. I don't see the benefit of 60 questions, over and above  that of 30

 

Nationwide,

I'm not suggesting that OCR "do more" (even though I'd like them to!) - I'm just trying to preserve the status quo where candidates can see a specimen paper for each discipline.

How else do they get to know, for example, that a question on say the topic of O-Licensing is three times more likely to crop up than one on marketing.  Understanding the topic weighting is important.

Sadly I find that the 60 question samples have already been taken down from the website.  I would otherwise have been able to quote other examples.

We have discussed plummeting pass rates without coming to any conclusion and OCR have yet to respond with facts.  Providing this Friday's candidates with less information than their predecessors have had will do nothing to help.

 

DavidSummers
DavidSu ...
Posts: 32

Hello Mike,

I've forwarded your comments to the Chair of Examiners and we don't feel it is necessary for learners to have 60 questions as a Sample Assessment Material and that having 30 questions is sufficient, given that they are designed to ensure that learners can see how the Multiple Choice operates and to get a feel for the questions.

I will follow up your comments on the MC issues with assessment colleagues re: 13 November and respond shortly.

thanks

David

 

Mike Grant
Mike Grant
Posts: 142
Quote:
Originally posted by DavidSummers, 12:10, 24th November 2016

Hello Mike,

I've forwarded your comments to the Chair of Examiners and we don't feel it is necessary for learners to have 60 questions as a Sample Assessment Material and that having ...

Read more
Read less

Hello Mike,

I've forwarded your comments to the Chair of Examiners and we don't feel it is necessary for learners to have 60 questions as a Sample Assessment Material and that having 30 questions is sufficient, given that they are designed to ensure that learners can see how the Multiple Choice operates and to get a feel for the questions.

I will follow up your comments on the MC issues with assessment colleagues re: 13 November and respond shortly.

thanks

David

 

David,

I am astonished that you and the "Chair of Examiners" feel able to unilaterally change a practice whch has been in place for some ten years.  What evidence was the decision based upon?

I must admit my first thought was that "30" was a typing error.  I didn't think for a moment that this was part of a deliberate strategy to suppress the information about P1 and R1 papers that is available to candidates and those teachers not working for OCR.

Students may not know anything about previous papers; they are not allowed any record of what questions they have been asked in the exam they sit or what answers were required; there is no realistic way to appeal any outcome.  The process is a traversty of the "transparency" obligation which should be expected of any examining body nowadays.

Now you are intent on withdrawing access to a full specimen of the papers they might expect.  Words fail me!

DavidSummers
DavidSu ...
Posts: 32
Quote:
Originally posted by Mike Grant, 7:27, 25th November 2016

David,

I am astonished that you and the "Chair of Examiners" feel able to unilaterally change a practice whch has been in place for some ten years.  What evidence was the decision based upon?

I ...

Read more
Read less

David,

I am astonished that you and the "Chair of Examiners" feel able to unilaterally change a practice whch has been in place for some ten years.  What evidence was the decision based upon?

I must admit my first thought was that "30" was a typing error.  I didn't think for a moment that this was part of a deliberate strategy to suppress the information about P1 and R1 papers that is available to candidates and those teachers not working for OCR.

Students may not know anything about previous papers; they are not allowed any record of what questions they have been asked in the exam they sit or what answers were required; there is no realistic way to appeal any outcome.  The process is a traversty of the "transparency" obligation which should be expected of any examining body nowadays.

Now you are intent on withdrawing access to a full specimen of the papers they might expect.  Words fail me!

Hello Mike,

Just for clarity, it is the Chair of Examiners that makes the decision. My role as Sector Manager is to assist in ensuring Centres and stakeholders are aware of such decisions (from a communications point of view, including the "OCR Community pages") but I am not involved in those assessment decisions.

I have raised both yours and Darren's comments as official complaints so that you receive a direct response from the Chair of Examiners.

thanks

David Summers

Sector Manager (CPC) 

 

Darren Ieronimo
Darren ...
Posts: 35
Quote:
Originally posted by Mike Grant, 7:27, 25th November 2016

David,

I am astonished that you and the "Chair of Examiners" feel able to unilaterally change a practice whch has been in place for some ten years.  What evidence was the decision based upon?

I ...

Read more
Read less

David,

I am astonished that you and the "Chair of Examiners" feel able to unilaterally change a practice whch has been in place for some ten years.  What evidence was the decision based upon?

I must admit my first thought was that "30" was a typing error.  I didn't think for a moment that this was part of a deliberate strategy to suppress the information about P1 and R1 papers that is available to candidates and those teachers not working for OCR.

Students may not know anything about previous papers; they are not allowed any record of what questions they have been asked in the exam they sit or what answers were required; there is no realistic way to appeal any outcome.  The process is a traversty of the "transparency" obligation which should be expected of any examining body nowadays.

Now you are intent on withdrawing access to a full specimen of the papers they might expect.  Words fail me!

Well said Mike Grant, Hear Hear (I'm wishing there was a 'Like' button). OCR's silence is deafening on this matter!!

Darren Ieronimo
Darren ...
Posts: 35
Quote:
Originally posted by DavidSummers, 12:10, 24th November 2016

Hello Mike,

I've forwarded your comments to the Chair of Examiners and we don't feel it is necessary for learners to have 60 questions as a Sample Assessment Material and that having ...

Read more
Read less

Hello Mike,

I've forwarded your comments to the Chair of Examiners and we don't feel it is necessary for learners to have 60 questions as a Sample Assessment Material and that having 30 questions is sufficient, given that they are designed to ensure that learners can see how the Multiple Choice operates and to get a feel for the questions.

I will follow up your comments on the MC issues with assessment colleagues re: 13 November and respond shortly.

thanks

David

 

David, surely 60 question sample assessments would be more realistic and fair to the candidates? After these past four years with 60 question samples we still have a poor pass rate nationally.

To me the 30 question samples will compound this situation and result in dwindling pass rates? If candidates take time to try & re-try the 60 question sample paper after training & revision their scores should generally improve and translate to a 'strong' pass in the R1/P1 exams. To remove this resource (and opportunity for improvement) would be a mistake IMO.

How about a compromise and generating 2 x 30 question sample papers and mark schemes for each discipline? Meet us in the middle as it were!!

Mike Grant
Mike Grant
Posts: 142

David,

Why only 30 questions?  Surely candidates need to see a whole paper to get a feel for the weighting given to each syllabus topic.

Are you able to respond to the MC issues raised separately in my 13th November posting, please?

Mike Grant